ePub eBooks From Apple Will Use FairPlay DRM

January 30, 2010

This has never been a question in my mind so I’m really shocked to see posts around wondering if the ePub eBooks sold through the iBookstore will have DRM.

Of course they will!

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I Won’t Miss Flash. Here’s Why, In One Image.

January 30, 2010

The site for the Sony Reader used to load quickly. Recently they did a revamp and clogged it all to hell with Flash. I had to go there today to find out a two-second bit of information: What dictionaries were in the Sony Reader.

I had to wait forever for this crap Flash to load first!


Click = big

Count the spinning wheels! And those are only the ones on-screen. There’s a bunch more off-screen too!

(Don’t bother trying this on your iPhone. Sony might have an iPhone-friendly version of the site.)

My crap desktop PC is old. A 1.6GHz Celeron. But still — the CPU in the iPad is a 1GHz A4. How much of that CPU do you want to see wasted on some insane web designer’s Flash wanking?

Kill off Flash, Apple. And good riddance to it!


iPad: iBooks Software Will Have Dictionary Lookup?

January 30, 2010

That’s what I surmise from a list of iPhone OS 3.2 SDK features listed over at Engadget.

Included dictionaries: Apple Dictionary, New Oxford American Dictionary, Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus, Shogakukan Daijisen, Shogakukan Progressive English-Japanese Japanese-English Dictionary, and Shogakukan Ruigo Reikai Jiten (may also be used for a Dictionary app perhaps?)

I understand the need for a dictionary for Pages. That’s necessary for spellcheck.

But with a dictionary baked in the OS anyway, adding dictionary word lookup to iBooks wouldn’t be a difficult thing.

Models of the Sony Reader with dictionary word lookup use New Oxford American Dictionary and Oxford Dictionary of English.

The Kindle uses The New Oxford American Dictionary.

The Barnes & Noble Nook uses Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary.

Also important:

Much richer text API including low-level access to font data and highlevel support for drawing formatted text

I don’t know if that will help eCrap ePub any. I suspect it’s more for a future use.


Archos To Do Seven-Inch Android Mini-Tablet

January 27, 2010

I was waiting for this shoe to drop!

Archos 7” Android Tablet appears for iPad-killer Price

Right now, it’s only a rumor.

But Archos has had a seven-inch mini-tablet for some time. It’s a frikkin beast — a metal-clad brick.

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Sony Bets The Farm On 3D TV

January 6, 2010

I came in late to a live vidcast from CES of Sony announcing something called the Dash. I missed that completely and am disinclined to look it up so close to my sleep time.

I did, however, see Howard Stringer pimp and pimp and pimp for 3D TV. Discovery Channel 3D HD. ESPN 3D HD. PlayStation 3D. Blu-Ray 3D.

Did anyone out there ever ask for 3D? Anyone?

Ray Bradbury hates television being such a “distraction.” But he apparently owns a large flatscreen HDTV. That’s something I’ll never own.

And I will also never own a 3D HDTV, either.

I don’t care that no one would ever see me watching it …

… I still don’t want to risk looking like a dick while doing so.

At least Sir Howard had the sense not to imagine a 3D Sony Reader.


Is The Amazon Kindle An Outright Fraud?

December 28, 2009

Amazon Says Kindle and E-Book Sales Set Records

Amazon.com said Monday that its Kindle e-reader has become the most gifted item in the company’s history, but didn’t provide specific sales numbers.

Boldfaced emphasis added by me.

This is the game Amazon has been playing since the introduction of the Kindle. A “Look over there!” game of misdirection that smells of outright fraud.

It’s well past time for Amazon to put up or shut up.

Honest companies don’t continue to hide something like this.

Honest companies show transparency.

Honest companies understand that real numbers are related to real shareholder value.

What is Amazon’s game here?

Is it the standard Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt ploy? Put fear in the minds of your competitors, put uncertainty in the minds of book publishers, put doubt in the minds of eBook device buyers?

Listen, it’s been claimed that Dan Brown’s blockbuster The Lost Symbol sold 200,000 eBook editions. But that was available in multiple formats. Plus we’re not even certain that number is either truthful or accurate.

Doesn’t anyone realize what an absolutely crappy sales figure that is given the hype the Kindle has gotten since its introduction?

Sony slogged for years and years and years, plastering ads all over the place — and managed to sell “only” 300,000 Readers.

I put “only” in quotes there because compared to the non-existent number of Kindles out there, that’s the impression left in comparison.

FUD.

We have been through a decade of outright fraud as noted in this New York Times column by Frank Rich. The fraudulent invasion of Iraq, the fraudulent hype of Enron, the fraudulent low-interest mortgages.

I’m saying until Amazon releases a true number, it smells as fraudulent as the rest of those, period.

And all of you publishers in New York City? It’s time for you to grow some balls.

I’m giving you a task: The first week in January, all of you issue a joint press release stating what your largest eBook sellers have been on the Kindle.

I have a feeling all of you are going to be shocked at the low cards you’ve been holding, while thinking your “competitor” has been holding a high card, making money hand over fist via Amazon Kindle Store downloads.

Do it!

Let’s end this stench one way or another.


Why A 7-Inch iTablet Makes Sense

December 23, 2009

Ever since the rumors stated the iTablet would have a ten-inch screen, I’ve been uneasy about that possibility.

In one of those rumors, it was asserted that Apple was going with ten inches due to a decree by Steve Jobs himself that anything less was too small.

The more I thought about that, the more nonsensical it became.

First of all, Steve Jobs has seen what the iPhone has done to the Internet.

Second of all, what we think about as a “proper” screen size is about to undergo a revolution.

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