Part Of The eBook Vision

NOTE: In the automated transition from Blogger to WordPress, this post apparently got eaten. Until I restore it, read the original at Blogger.

5 Responses to Part Of The eBook Vision

  1. apsed says:

    Well done, Mike! for decrypting all these suggestive ideas/concepts from the video flow…

    Editis should really publish a "making of" in order to open a discussion about all these features. This would be useful for all designers from hardware manufacturers, software publishers, authors, editors…

  2. Snowbag says:

    About the physical store: first, I suspect that it is a way for the publisher not to alienate (independent) booksellers, still a fairly influential part of the Francophone/European book market. It is a way for them to say to their vendors, "see, you can be part of this, too." Oh, everybody is visiting Amazon.fr or whatever instead? Gee, we didn't see that coming.

    Second, books are sold (and maybe stolen) in a slightly different manner than music or video. While the video shows the gentleman choosing his books by the cover, most folk like to look though a book, examine the index, see the pictures included, etc. It is hard to buy some books without ever seeing the physical text.

    Amazon's browse feature is okay, but sometimes not enough. A Google book preview/partial scan is good, too, but uncommon for new books. So a retail space where you can see the book might be nice. I do this all the time: see books at Barnes & Noble or even the library that I can get later via the used market or Amazon. I frequently need to take a look before I buy. Of course, I don't like to pay retail, and I doubt if anyone will really want an e-book at the same price as a published work, despite what Editis proposes.

    For music, we have the radio, myspace, and speedy theft that doesn't really require extended previewing before purchase or theft. And I suspect that a lot more stolen music is either sitting unplayed on a 500GB drive or just trashed than people acknowledge. Reviews, clips, and trailers motivate the purchase and theft of film and video. The experience with the text is a little different. Reviews help with some books for some folk. But real browsing is a big deal, still, I suspect–not that we can't be weaned from it.

    As I'm writing this, I wonder if my assertions would seem particularly archaic if I substituted "LP" or "CD" for book. "People love to browse record stores"–blah, blah, an argument that has already been proven wrong. Part of the difference is that you couldn't usually hear the music you were browsing. That's one of iTunes' strengths. You can always peek between the covers of a book. What's an e-delivery system really going to bring to the table? And can it survive if it isn't significantly based on theft?

    The texts shown in the demo video seems particularly advanced, not plain old txt or password-protected pdf. Clearly DRM is implied throughout. It is interesting how the video didn't present locked versions that provide previews and purchase options, particularly as this would be an issue for epubs more along the lines of magazines or journals.

    Oh, did you note the apple postmark on the iCard/ecard?

  3. Xelle says:

    We just posted the english subtitled version of this video on YouTube :


    We are very interested in all your comments on this vision !

  4. Steve says:

    I agree with Apsed, I would love to read more about the making of this video. Like many, I've been watching the news from Plastic Logic and Apple with interest, but everything I thought could be done with an e-book now seems banal!

    Editis obviously employed an extremely imaginative writer and director, while the quality of the screen simulations, perhaps CGI work, also impresses greatly.

    Previously, I'd always imagined an e-book as a tablet, but this video shows the slim folding format ( in both orientations) offers many advantages.
    Steve

  5. Mike Cane says:

    Did you see the English-language version?

    English-Subtitled Editis Smart Digital Book Video

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: